Google calendar week

Kid schedules are hard enough to follow without factoring in two or more households, child handovers, visitations and multiple calendars. A good option is to start an online calendar that all parties can access. Appointments can be scheduled with notices and reminders going out via email, and entries can even be color coded as to who is picking up or dropping off the kids.

This is also possibly a good solution if there are contact restrictions or conflict between parents, so scheduling can be solidified without direct contact between the parties. Talk to your attorney or the courts before starting a joint calendar if there is a restraining order or order of protection in effect.

Some examples of the many free online calendars are Google Calendar, Teamup Calendar, and LoCalendar.

Facebook app in front of Facebook

Facebook has published a quick video on how to block someone from seeing your posts, comments, and even pictures tagged with you in them. As they state, sometimes you just need some space. Plus, it’s usually always a wise idea when in the midst of litigation to block the opposing party or anyone who might feed them information on your activities.

Obama’s Gandhian hardball

The politics of perception is a funny thing. Pass a $780 billion economic bill and a migratory flock of pundits proclaim the failure of bipartisanship. But the New Yorker’s Hedrick Hertzberg sees a metagame silver-lining (well, that, and passing the damn bill):

Fifty years ago, the civil-rights movement understood that nonviolence can be an effective weapon even if—or especially if—the other side refuses to follow suit. Obama has a similarly tough-minded understanding of the political uses of bipartisanship, which, even if it fails as a tactic for compromise, can succeed as a tonal strategy: once the other side makes itself appear intransigently, destructively partisan, the game is half won. Obama is learning to throw the ball harder. But it’s not Rovian hardball he’s playing. More like Gandhian hardball.

Gandhi, of course, played only hardball, and played only to win. He understood better than anyone that the battle of perception had to be waged at the nexus of the enemy’s hypocrisy and conscience. Finding that nexus is the tricky part.